Stigmatized Property

General Discussion About Anything Amityville And Other Paranormal Topics
kathyM
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by kathyM » Fri Apr 19, 2013 1:27 pm

I wondered that too. Would the realtor mention it? There will always be drive by photogs and gawkers that these new owners would have to deal with. Could the new owners that up after they buy that they weren't told about it? :think:
It is possible they wouldn't know that was the house maybe only having heard of the house but not knowing what street or exact house it is.

I would sure like to know how the realtor would handle this situation.

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Jacobmarley1
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Jacobmarley1 » Fri Apr 19, 2013 9:18 pm

Because not everybody is as invested in time and energy on knowing all there is to know about "the house next door" as we are. Some "regular" folks may be familiar with the movies, but the house next door doesn't even look that way anymore (if it ever did). Let's face it: we're the abnormalites, not the regular house-hunting John and Jane Doe's of the world.

As much harder it would be to sell it, I still think any realty would be obligated in full disclosure, for to not do so is blatant deceit, and dishonesty by omission.

The real estate is promising a nice, quiet, upscale neighborhood, for which the customer is paying damn good money (taxes) to live in. The truth is much more horrifying [my own spooky trailer voice-over].

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quotestheraven
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by quotestheraven » Sat Apr 20, 2013 10:35 am

My brother-in-law's family is in Suffolk County. So, one time for grins and giggles my sister and her husband went looking at houses in Amityville. They looked at a house right down the road from The House, and the realitor told them it was down the street and sometimes there were people who stopped and gawked.

And people stop and gawk at the house so much that I think anyone looking at the Ireland house would be like, "What's up with all these cars stopping and taking pictures of the house next door?"
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Victoria Principles
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Victoria Principles » Sun Apr 21, 2013 4:19 pm

Jacobmarley1 wrote:Because not everybody is as invested in time and energy on knowing all there is to know about "the house next door" as we are. Some "regular" folks may be familiar with the movies, but the house next door doesn't even look that way anymore (if it ever did). Let's face it: we're the abnormalites, not the regular house-hunting John and Jane Doe's of the world.

As much harder it would be to sell it, I still think any realty would be obligated in full disclosure, for to not do so is blatant deceit, and dishonesty by omission.

The real estate is promising a nice, quiet, upscale neighborhood, for which the customer is paying damn good money (taxes) to live in. The truth is much more horrifying [my own spooky trailer voice-over].

Jacob, most people on Long Island know about the house. To them, it's the Hoax House rather than the Haunted House, but they know about it.

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Amity108
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Amity108 » Sun Apr 21, 2013 8:11 pm

Yes they do know about it and the ones outside of Amityville have even checked it out at least once. They refer that house as "the horror house" and pretty much laugh at anyone interested in it.
A lot of flies, a lot of mud...a lot of everything in there. If I were you, I'd stay out of there!

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Wed Jul 24, 2013 3:11 am

How would you feel buying the neighborhood murder house?

My family and I relocated to the Midwest in December and, after a long and painful readjustment, we are finally house hunting in earnest. We found a house this week that is just about perfect. Beautifully redone, great price in a great school district with a beautiful yard. There is just one problem.

A murder/suicide occurred in the house in September. It was the first homicide in the area in eleven years. The event took place in the master bedroom and was apparently quite horrible. Would this influence your decision to put in an offer? Would there be any factors outside of "supernatural" concerns that you would have with such a house?

posted by extraheavymarcellus to home & garden (49 answers total)
http://ask.metafilter.com/245245/Amityv ... -What-Wins

Some interesting, non-ghost related answers... seems most people would have no problem moving in.

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:30 am

Houses of horror - can a murder house absorb evil?

IF walls could talk, they would tell a bloody story of what happened inside 6 Collins Street, Ryde on July 10, 2001.

That was the evening 20-year-old Sef Gonzales entered his sister Clodine's bedroom armed with a baseball bat and two kitchen knives.

After slaughtering Clodine, Gonzales proceeded to stab and bludgeon his entire family, leaving an unspeakable scene of bloodstained walls and gore.

The house was subsequently cleaned and then "freshened up" for sale.

Disaster ensued. A young Buddhist couple put a deposit on the property, only to discover the real estate agent had not disclosed the house's horror history.

They withdrew, the agent was fined and eventually a less squeamish family moved in for a bargain price.

Other "houses of horror" never make it back on to the property market, notably 2207 Seymour Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, the scene of Ariel Castro's unspeakable crimes against three young women over more than a decade.

The bulldozing of the house within days of Castro's sentencing suggests the community - and Castro's victims - could not sustain the emotional reminder of what occurred behind its locked doors.

But can a house really absorb the "evil" that has happened inside?

While real estate agents tend to say no - but agree houses that have been "stigmatised" by violent acts should attract a lower resale price - the head of the Real Estate Institute of Australia (REIA) confesses he is still spooked by a murder-suicide which happened while he was selling a house 37 years ago.

REIA president Peter Bushby was an inexperienced 20-year-old when he was called to do a divorce property settlement appraisal of a house in the Tasmanian town of Launceston.

"The man told me to come back in half an hour because he was busy," Mr Bushby said.

"I drove by about 20 minutes later and there was another car there, so I went down to the shop and bought a Fanta.

"Then I went back to the house. The door was ajar and I pushed it in a fraction and I could see a body in there and what looked like dark fluid.

"My sixth sense told me not to go in and I went down to the police station. The police found three bodies, a double murder and suicide.

"The police told me it was just as well I hadn't gone in or I could have been the fourth victim. I suppose if I'm really honest, to this day every time I go to a vacant house there's a split second..."

Mr Bushby doesn't believe in haunted houses, but understands the sentiment.

The house where the man who was briefly his client murdered his estranged wife and her brother - who had three children under the age of four - has come back on to the market, but Mr Bushby says he would never handle its sale.

"I think it depends on what exactly has happened in the house," he said. "If an old person died or someone committed suicide, I don't think the house is stigmaitized.

"But if there has been violence, or a series of violent acts, then people get freaked out.

"They are superstitious and you can understand why they wouldn't want to live there, or some people will if the price is substantially reduced."

Would you live in a house of horror?

Property blogger Maya Anderson, of house-nerd.com, is one person who could not.

"While some people wouldn't be bugged in the slightest about it, I would be," she said.

"I think when you walk into a house you can feel what kind of energy it has.

"Sometimes when I see houses for work, I think a house is going to be amazing and then I walk in and feel chills.

"Yes, maybe if horrible things happened in a house, sure, you can infuse it with love and make it feel good again.

"But if I were living in a house where I knew someone had been stabbed to death? I would think about it all the time.

"I would keep picturing a person so terrified, dragging themselves across the floor trying to flee their killer, realising they are going to die, taking their last ragged breaths, thinking about where they'd realised it was over."

Tim Mendham, executive officer of Australian Skeptics, says "from a scientific point of view haunted houses are complete rubbish - as far as we know".

"It's an emotional response for people to be frightened about a house where things have happened, but from a logical point of view poltergeist activity and such like do not hold up.

"People have irrational fears and the power of suggestion is very important."
Followed by examples - including 112 - and a picture of George and Kathy I have never seen before!

http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/houses- ... 6696260133

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Tue Oct 22, 2013 2:32 pm

So now there's this site...

http://www.diedinhouse.com/

...only $11.99 a go! :shock:
Did someone die in your house? Website claims to give you the truth

As Halloween approaches, here's a thought to keep you up at night: did someone die in your home?

Think about it. There's every chance that someone may have passed away in your home, and not just by violent means, as in the home that served as the inspiration for "The Amityville Horror," pictured above. Accidents, suicides, natural causes ... there are plenty of reasons why someone may have breathed their last before you arrived in your home. And in most cases, real estate agents and sellers aren't required to voluntarily disclose such facts unless the death was the direct result of the house's condition or a newsworthy event.

Certainly, the older your home, the more likely someone once walked in and was carried out. Now, a website purports to give you peace of mind by providing you with certification that someone didn't die in your home

DiedInHouse searches 118 million public records to see if your address, or your prospective new address, shows up in connection with any deaths. For $11.99, the site provides you with a custom report documenting who died in the house, and if known, how. For instance, if you were looking to purchase 171 Lake Washington Boulevard in Seattle, you might take notice of the fact that a man by the name of Kurt Cobain killed himself there, though chances are you'd probably have learned that yourself along the way.

It's worth noting that DiedInHouse distances itself from any "technical, typographical, or photographic errors" that may exist in the information. But as a first-sweep tool, this could help buyers, sellers and real estate agents remove at least one element of concern.

So. Brave enough to check your own address? Visit DiedInHouse to see.
http://news.yahoo.com/did-someone-die-i ... 43998.html

kathyM
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by kathyM » Tue Oct 22, 2013 2:51 pm

Darn it, I wish I would have thought of that idea! I could make a killing! :lol:

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Tue Oct 22, 2013 5:40 pm


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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Wed Oct 23, 2013 5:11 am

Does Satan worship lower a Las Vegas mansion's value?

The mansion's owner gets an answer from real estate appraiser Randall Bell, who has carved out a singular niche determining the worth of stigmatized properties.

They came to the Las Vegas mansion in waves, chasing tales of ghosts and murder. Some came to gawk or snap photos in front of its black metal gate. Others came to worship Satan. Thrill seekers broke in and drew pentagrams and carved upside-down crosses throughout the house.

The vandals came after "Ghost Adventures" featured the mansion on an episode that warned of a "nasty, evil spirit" that lurked inside. The homeowner fumed and sued. He wanted the Travel Channel show to pay damages.

But how do you calculate the effect that demons have on property value?

You ask Randall Bell.

The 54-year-old Laguna Beach resident is a doom-and-gloom real estate appraiser. He has carved out a singular niche, fielding calls from governments, big businesses, crime victims and international media, all seeking insight into the worth of stigmatized properties.

His caseload is ripped from the headlines: Nicole Brown Simpson's Brentwood condo; the Rancho Santa Fe mansion where 39 Heaven's Gate cult members committed suicide; JonBenet Ramsey's house in Colorado; the World Trade Center site; properties damaged in the Rodney King riots and by Hurricane Katrina.

Bell recently estimated the financial toll that the mansion's owner, Keith Resnick, alleges that "Ghost Adventures" inflicted on his house, which is in a posh neighborhood in sight of the Stratosphere hotel. During one of his visits last year, Bell went from room to room, surveying the vandalism.

He pondered the lost value from the perception — created by the show — that mobsters had carried out executions here.

The fire damage, crumbling stucco and repeated break-ins after the show aired in 2010 meant that his client would lose a lot of money in selling the house he had once planned to live in. For Bell, it was yet another case in a long, strange career.

"I love a challenge — the biggest, baddest, bring it on," Bell says. "Every day of the week, there are new places to go and new disasters."

In death, celebrities and ordinary people are equal — their murders lower a property's value by the same percentage, Bell says.

Nothing matters more — even the horrors that took place — than perception. That's especially true in the case of Resnick's mansion, where Bell says no evidence supports stories of ghosts and mob murders.

But people believed what they saw on the TV show, which Resnick says was filmed inside the house without his permission. After the show aired, police calls to the vacant house exploded. Some young troublemakers and trespassers even posted on YouTube their own ghost hunts at the house.

Bell visited the house four times before coming to his conclusion.

"The fire was right over here," he says, pointing to a spot on the floor where he previously saw a pentagram scrawled in ash. "You could see where they did their little ritual thing."
Full article:

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-c ... .htmlstory

ElletheDuck
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by ElletheDuck » Sun Jan 12, 2014 10:18 pm

I've lived in an apartment where there was a guy brutally murdered in it (with my son) and the rent was half price, but I didn't get carpet and there were bullet holes in the front door. It was pretty obvious. I also lived in a house where the lady died. Both times they disclosed it, but I think Texas has to.

It doesn't bother me if I know, but I'd be pretty ticked if they didn't. I'm in TN now and I'm not sure what the law is. Now, I own my own house I built, so unless I kill someone, it's pretty clean.

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Rokiisun
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Rokiisun » Tue Jan 14, 2014 8:50 am

I never knew I had deaths in my house till my nasty upstairs neighbour mentioned it
in an attempt to drive me out. Never worked though. I wish somebody would have told
me about him though, he's more of a horror if anything else.
It is better to return a borrowed pot with a little something you last cooked in it.

kathyM
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by kathyM » Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:22 pm

Sometimes the living (such as your neighbor)are more scary than the dead! :)

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Rokiisun
I am the year 1989
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Rokiisun » Tue Jan 14, 2014 5:27 pm

Very true. In the last year two previous owners have fled and I (the third)
am on the list to be re-housed. Sometimes humans themselves are haunted.
It is better to return a borrowed pot with a little something you last cooked in it.

Victoria Principles
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Victoria Principles » Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:14 am

kathyM wrote:Sometimes the living (such as your neighbor)are more scary than the dead! :)

Ask the Cromartie's which they feared more, the ghosts in the Amityville Horror house or the people who descended on the house after the book and movie came out in the late 70'.

kathyM
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by kathyM » Wed Jan 15, 2014 8:09 am

You are quite a trip arent you. :fp:

Victoria Principles
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Victoria Principles » Wed Jan 15, 2014 9:06 am

kathyM wrote:You are quite a trip arent you. :fp:

Thank you. :fp: :fp:

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BooshaGirl
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by BooshaGirl » Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:08 pm

Ack! I went to that site and they want like $12 to tell you. I already know someone died in my house, but I'd be curious to see if anyone died in any of the houses in which I lived. I think SOME states have laws that force the realtor to tell if someone died...and some must tell only if asked.

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DC Fan
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by DC Fan » Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:17 pm

$12 seems a bit ridiculous to me too. If it was a high profile crime or suicide that would have been front page news there are ways to research it yourself for free.

Either way I have questions about reliability or just how useful it is. Even if they look up obituaries for ordinary deaths, not all obits mention whether the person died at home, in the hospital, in a nursing home or even in that car that you recently bought used.

And then there is the question of whether it even makes a difference where someone dies. After having minor experiences in a university dorm room I rented in Ottawa as a tourist, I later found out on a TV program that the room was inhabited by Nadia Kajouji, a young lady who committed suicide. But she did not kill herself in the room. She jumped off a nearby railroad bridge into the Rideau River.

kathyM
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by kathyM » Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:25 pm

Boosha, have you had any happenings in your house? How did you find out about the death?

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