Stigmatized Property

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:41 pm

DC Fan wrote:After having minor experiences in a university dorm room I rented in Ottawa as a tourist, I later found out on a TV program that the room was inhabited by Nadia Kajouji, a young lady who committed suicide. But she did not kill herself in the room.
Interesting, what were the "minor experiences"?

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DC Fan
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by DC Fan » Wed Jan 15, 2014 7:13 pm

sherbetbizarre wrote:
DC Fan wrote:After having minor experiences in a university dorm room I rented in Ottawa as a tourist, I later found out on a TV program that the room was inhabited by Nadia Kajouji, a young lady who committed suicide. But she did not kill herself in the room.
Interesting, what were the "minor experiences"?
Mostly doors and lights being different from the way I left them when going for breakfast or convenience store trips. I confirmed that there was nobody in the other three rooms that share a common bathroom and kitchen after I found that someone had the air conditioning off when I checked in. Could it have been due to the cleaning lady? No, because we are talking about early morning or evenings when she was not around. At first I thought it was just my imagination but the kicker for me was the shower curtain. I never close a shower curtain except when I am inside and after I returned from breakfast I found it closed. There was nothing inside but that was when I started thinking that I might not be just imagining things or having a memory problem.

I almost totally forgot about it until a couple months later when I saw this on my TV, showing the camera going down the hallway to the same room:

http://www.cbc.ca/fifth/episodes/2009-2010/death-online

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by scipio-USMC » Wed Jan 15, 2014 9:55 pm

DC Fan wrote:
sherbetbizarre wrote:
DC Fan wrote:After having minor experiences in a university dorm room I rented in Ottawa as a tourist, I later found out on a TV program that the room was inhabited by Nadia Kajouji, a young lady who committed suicide. But she did not kill herself in the room.
Interesting, what were the "minor experiences"?
Mostly doors and lights being different from the way I left them when going for breakfast or convenience store trips. I confirmed that there was nobody in the other three rooms that share a common bathroom and kitchen after I found that someone had the air conditioning off when I checked in. Could it have been due to the cleaning lady? No, because we are talking about early morning or evenings when she was not around. At first I thought it was just my imagination but the kicker for me was the shower curtain. I never close a shower curtain except when I am inside and after I returned from breakfast I found it closed. There was nothing inside but that was when I started thinking that I might not be just imagining things or having a memory problem.

I almost totally forgot about it until a couple months later when I saw this on my TV, showing the camera going down the hallway to the same room:

http://www.cbc.ca/fifth/episodes/2009-2010/death-online
My microwave keeps turning itself on, I had to unplug it. I arrived home to find it on. Since then it has turned itself on multiple times. Electrical items can suffer from shorts, surges and the like and become damaged and after that odd things happen. Many mysteries are explainable but we don't realize it because we don't investigate in detail liek I am not taking my icrowave apart if it keeps up it will be junked and I will get a new one.

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by DC Fan » Thu Jan 16, 2014 6:03 am

Scipio:

The doors and shower curtain were not electric. Even the AC was turned off manually, although possibly by the last person who occupied the room, even though in theory they always left it on.

Either way I agree not to make too much of this. I don't think I have given any proof of an afterlife and I do question why everything has to be explained by postulating dead people coming back. If I could take my laptop into a time machine and show a movie to Isaac Newton maybe he would run to the hills as if something supernatural was chasing him. So maybe those of us who run to the hills today, or to San Diego in 1976, are running from something totally natural that we just don't understand at this point in our history.

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Mon Jan 20, 2014 6:41 am

Here's a handy "How to Rent Out or Sell Haunted Property" in Singapore:

http://theindependent.sg/how-to-rent-ou ... -property/

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Thu Apr 10, 2014 4:29 pm

Living with ghosts: The rising popularity of ‘death rooms’ in Japan

In Japan, places where people have died are considered bad luck, so unsurprisingly apartments where there has been a suicide, murder, or other death are rented at much cheaper prices than usual due to a lack of demand. However, real estate agencies are seeing a surge in people specifically seeking these kinds of ‘death rooms’. That may sound horribly morbid, but usually it’s not out of a desire to be close to death. Rather, for those who can put aside their culturally-ingrained reservations, it’s a way to save money during tough times.

Incident buildings

Buildings where a death has occurred are called ‘jiko bukken‘ in Japanese or ‘incident buildings’, an ambiguous phrasing similar to the ‘jinshin jiko‘ or ‘human accident’ used when someone has jumped in front of a train.

People assume that there will be some damage to the room because of the corpse, but Chizuko, the owner of a real estate agency that deals exclusively with incident buildings, explained that ‘these days we have more advanced cleaning techniques, and after a while the smell and the stains will disappear.’ But it’s not just the nitty-gritty practical considerations that discourage Japanese people from living in such places – there is a cultural stigma which leads people to feel that the place is tainted and impure, and will invite unhappiness into the life of the next inhabitant. However, these days real estate agents are finding that people with less economic means are willing and even eager to live in these cheaper places.

Tough times

A 40-year-old man, let’s call him Yamada, who used to work as a dispatch worker began living in his one-room apartment in June 2012. His apartment is located within Shinjuku ward in central Tokyo and is over 20 years old.

Yet for such a central area, his rent is astoundingly cheap at just 40,000 yen (US$391) per month, around half the local average. (Don’t even get me started on the average Tokyo rent!) The reason for this low rate is that the previous tenant was found dead in the room from illness. Yamada was aware of this when he moved in as in Japan there is a legal requirement to disclose any deaths that have occurred in the property within a certain time frame.

After graduating high school, Yamada worked part time at restaurants and call centers, and with various temping agencies, but after the collapse of the bubble economy his salary also nosedived from 4 million ($39,000) annually to around 2 million ($19,500). When searching for somewhere to live Yamada’s friend who worked as a real estate agent, and knew about his tough financial situation, suggested he specifically look for these ‘accident buildings’. His buddy told him that he had to move quickly if he found one of these buildings as they had become very popular, so he signed the contract right away. Yamada himself said ‘I’m not bothered by the previous tenant. I’m very satisfied with it as a place to live.” This is an attitude that is starting to become more prevalent, particularly among younger people.
Full story - http://en.rocketnews24.com/2014/04/09/l ... -in-japan/

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Rokiisun
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Rokiisun » Thu Apr 17, 2014 7:23 pm

That's quite interesting. I wonder if there is truth to these superstitions... :think:
It is better to return a borrowed pot with a little something you last cooked in it.

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Wed Jul 09, 2014 5:29 am

Woman Discovers Rental Was Formerly a Murder Chamber Used By Killer

You never know what you're going to find when you move into a new home. The last time I moved, I found asbestos (good thing there are all those lawyer ads on TV), but a Missouri woman found something much more sinister: Her home had been used as a torture chamber. And she didn't learn it from the landlord.

Catrina McGhaw had no idea that the home she had moved into in March had anything to do with a serial killer and her landlord, Sandra Travis, didn't tell her. That's likely because Travis is the mother of Maury Travis, a man who was suspected of killing 12 to 20 women. Maury Travis killed himself while in jail, but police believe that many of the women, who were tortured before being murdered, were killed in the basement of the home McGhaw rented.

McGhaw only learned about the connection to murders when her friend called her and told her to watch a documentary about serial-killers. That must have actually been really terrifying. I can't imagine someone calling me up and saying "there's this doc on murder you need to see before you do anything else" (my friends speak only in Upworthy headlines) and feeling okay about anything. When McGhaw watched the video, she learned that the basement of her home had been used to hold and torture women.

Maury Travis was never charged for any of the killings that he has been accused of, but police were able to find him after he wrote a letter to a newspaper boasting about killing 17 people. Police were able to trace a map that Travis included with the letter back to his computer because he had used a web application to create it. The map was meant to lead to the body of one of the victims.

When police searched Travis' home, they found holding cells in the basement and videos of Travis torturing the victims. Travis was charged with two counts of kidnapping (which could have led to the death penalty). He hanged himself in his cell before he could be tried.

When McGhaw tried to break her lease, Travis' mother refused, saying that she had told McGhaw what had gone on in the house. That seems a little hard to believe, especially considering how few people (I know there are some) would voluntarily move into a home that had previously been used as a death chamber ("but the original crown moulding will make up for all of that!"). The housing authority agreed with McGhaw and convinced her landlord to break the lease.

It's important to note that, according to housing authorities, Missouri does not have any laws regarding disclosure and that Travis' mother had no legal responsibility to tell McGha about the murders. Still, this story makes me think that there should be public service announcements for such thing. Asking whether someone had been brutally murdered in a home I'm about to rent is basically the first thing I do. (But I am also very neurotic.)

McGhaw will move at the end of July.
http://jezebel.com/woman-discovers-rent ... 1602027236

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Mon Jul 28, 2014 3:25 am

Tragedies are not “structural defects”

If you’ve read “The Amityville Horror” or seen one of the many movies spun from it, you’re familiar with the tale it tells: A family moved into an abode on Long Island in 1975, a little more than a year after six people were shot and killed inside it. They only lasted there for 28 days, having been chased away by rampaging ghosts and an escalating series of alarming paranormal events.

The veracity of the story was later called into question, particularly since it so closely resembled the tone and texture of the “The Exorcist,” which obliterated box office records a few years before. But, along with jolting moviegoers and making readers a little more wary of the creaking noises in the attic or the funky odors in the basement, “The Amityville Horror” undoubtedly made a couple of generations of home buyers ask their real estate agents if anything, well, out of the ordinary, ever transpired in the clean, well-manicured house they were thinking about purchasing.

Last week, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled that, while those real estate agents should not necessarily hide any untoward events that occurred at a given property, they are under no legal obligation to divulge them. While we understand moving into an address that was once the domicile of a hatchet murderer might make a sound sleep a little harder to come by, the court made the right call – “psychological stigmas,” as Justice J. Michael Eakin described them, do not constitute the same kind of structural problems as moldy ceilings or sloping floors.

The court made the ruling as the result of a lawsuit filed by a California woman who purchased a home near Philadelphia in 2007 that had recently been the site of a murder-suicide. The new owner only found out about why the house landed on the market from one of the neighbors after she moved in, and she subsequently argued if she had been duly informed of the tragedy, she would never have signed on the dotted line and paid $610,000 for the house.

That would certainly have been her prerogative. But one can assume someone who has sufficient resources to buy a house worth over a half-million dollars also has a computer at home or work, and would be able to place the address in a Google search, as most reasonably savvy home-shoppers are in the habit of doing nowadays. Doing so would have quickly revealed detailed information on the murder-suicide, which received wide play in the media.

Besides, if home sellers did have to reveal every terrible thing that might have occurred in a house, how much digging would they have to do and how much would they be liable for? Let’s say you have a house that’s 160 or 170 years old. Some people might have been born there, but it’s a good bet that many also died there. Does this lower a house’s value? If the house is otherwise structurally sound, most of us would say no. What if, say, a Civil War veteran who was an amputee had wandered its halls after returning from the conflict? Or that Nazi prisoners of war broke bread in its kitchen while they were in custody during World War II? These are things that give a house character and a rich identity, and increase its value.

And for anyone who wrings their hands about what might have happened inside a house, there’s a simple, painfully obvious solution – buy a new one.
http://www.observer-reporter.com/articl ... 9YfouN31Y4

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Sat Sep 06, 2014 4:28 am

Christopher posted this on Facebook... I wonder why ;)
Family Who Moved Into Former Powell Home Says Mysterious Events Forced Them Out

The family currently renting the home formerly owned by Josh and Susan Powell says they have moved out.

Joanna Aeosana says since she and her family moved in two months ago numerous mysterious events have occurred inside the home. She says the company who leased the house to her never shared the history of the home.

In 2009, Susan Cox Powell disappeared from the home and was never seen again. Her husband, Josh Powell, was the only person of interest in the case. He later ended up killing himself and the couple's two sons in a house fire in Washington State.

Aeosana says she was unaware of the Powells' story and says, almost from the moment her family moved in, strange things have been happening.

"I hear people crying when I'm showering," she told 2News.

Aeosana also says the garage door opens and closes on its own. Most recently, she said her 1-year-old son was talking to an empty swing in the front yard and saying, "Go away, leave me alone."

Aoesana says she didn't know about the history of the home until a neighbor told her. In the last few days, she said her family has moved out and is asking that the company who leased out the home, American Homes 4 Rent, help them find a different place to live or allow them to get out of the lease. The home is being held in a trust as the details of the estate are being worked out.

Real estate agents are not required to disclose the personal history of the home, but Aeosana says they should have a moral or ethical obligation to do so.

"I believe they should have told me," said Aoesana. "I just don't want to be in there."
http://www.kutv.com/news/top-stories/st ... 3562.shtml

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by DC Fan » Sat Sep 06, 2014 6:12 am

Maybe someone has already thought of this angle already and I'm not seeing it here.

I would think that most of the houses up for sale have the current owners living in them, or maybe a tenant or relative living there. Sometimes not.

If there is nobody currently living in a house, would it not make sense to ask why?

This could be a tough question for a real estate agent to answer if there is no desire to disclose that owner had been murdered or that the owner thinks that it is haunted.

Of course this is not sure-fire protection if the answer is just that the current owner bought and moved into a bigger place or some other logically believable situation.

But if agents are asked why the current owner is not living there, could they be liable to a lawsuit if they categorically lie about it and the situation then becomes more than just a failure to disclose but also some issue of fraudulent misrepresentation? :think:

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by quotestheraven » Tue Sep 09, 2014 3:25 pm

Well, we specifically asked before we bought our house if anyone ever died in the house. The sellers just kind of never answered.

Then on the day we moved in one of my friend's sons kept insisting there was a spirit upstairs. Occassionally, our dogs bark at nothing in the upstairs hallway.

Then this past Saturday, my puppy Goldie and I were home alone. My husband was out with our other dog. I was in the bathroom with Goldie (she follows me around when the other dog isn't home). All of a sudden Goldie's tennis ball came bouncing into the bathroom as if someone out in the hallway had tossed it.

Apart from that, we have seen nothing and felt nothing. Sometimes we hear weird noises at night, but we are in an urban neighborhood and the houses are very close together. Seriously, I can lean out my hall window and touch my neighbor's house. So, I attribute the noises to being in an urban neighborhood and so close to the neighbors. We've always felt very at home in this house. The first time we ever came here I only made it as far as the kitchen when I said to my husband, "Let's buy this house."
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Rokiisun
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Rokiisun » Sun Sep 14, 2014 5:29 pm

People died in my last house. It wasn't disclosed to me but it never bothered me,
You kind of half-expect these things with the houses age. I think there's been a
death in this house too, but again, it doesn't bother me. The only thing that
does is the debt letters they still receive here.

The only thing that concerns me with any house is the neighbours and the
neighbourhood in general. After last year's nonsense I went through I now
always ask about neighbours.
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Amityville Rock » Sat Oct 11, 2014 12:13 pm

I've always wondered knowing the fearsome reputation of the 108 Ocean Avenue how come it always sells for market value? Shouldn't the house be a steal, relatively speaking, because of the stigmatized property rule?
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Chichibcc » Sat Oct 11, 2014 8:44 pm

I think that the passage of time has helped to raise the value of the house up to what is considered "typical" for the area, not to mention all the renovations done to it over the years, which have also provided a boost.
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Amity108 » Sun Oct 12, 2014 9:16 am

Chichibcc wrote:I think that the passage of time has helped to raise the value of the house up to what is considered "typical" for the area, not to mention all the renovations done to it over the years, which have also provided a boost.
You're absolutely right!
A lot of flies, a lot of mud...a lot of everything in there. If I were you, I'd stay out of there!

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Victoria Principles » Mon Oct 13, 2014 2:14 pm

Amityville Rock wrote:I've always wondered knowing the fearsome reputation of the 108 Ocean Avenue how come it always sells for market value? Shouldn't the house be a steal, relatively speaking, because of the stigmatized property rule?
The O'Neills lost money on the house. But Brian Wilson got a nice return on the money he put into the house.

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Sat Oct 18, 2014 3:49 pm

The challenges of selling a haunted house

Cindi Hagley knows your dilemma. The San Francisco-area real estate agent has made a specialty of selling houses that are thought to be inhabited by spirits or have some kind of notorious reputation. In real estate, such homes are known as stigmatized. They carry a generally unsavory image because of spooks, a violent crime or some other tragedy that occurred there, and thus are harder to sell.

Hagley, who has a mainstream real estate business but maintains a branch called Past Life Homes, says she sells several such properties a year. She also acts as a consultant to consumers and agents around the country who are struggling to sell homes that have such a taint. Typically, the situation isn't as dramatic as, say, "The Amityville Horror," she explained. Whether it comes down to booting out the ghosts or merely working around the fact that a house has been a grisly crime scene, there are ways to make a stigmatized home more palatable to the average buyer, Hagley said.

Heck, some buyers even like the idea of living down the hall from a ghost, she said. This is an edited version of our conversation:
Q & A at:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classifie ... story.html

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Wed Feb 04, 2015 5:43 pm

Talk about a morbid promotion.

Have you ever wondered if someone died in your home? I actually never thought about it, but now I know, nobody has. But what about you?

DiedInHouse.com will uncover the secrets buried in homes across the US.

At the end of the Poltergeist trailer (debuting tomorrow, February 5th at 9:00amPST) fans will receive an exclusive promo code. Those who visit DiedinHouse.com will for a limited time, enter the promo code POLTERGEIST to learn the truth about their home.

Diedinhouse.com is the first of its kind, web-based service that helps you find out if anyone has died at any valid US address. Died In House™ instantly searches millions of records to determine if a death has occurred at that location.

This promotion will be sponsored by Poltergeist the movie only in theaters July 24, 2015.
http://bloody-disgusting.com/news/33309 ... ied-house/

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by kblur77 » Wed Feb 04, 2015 8:08 pm

revolution 9

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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Fri Jul 03, 2015 3:28 am

Is 'The Watcher' house now as toxic as O.J. Simpson, Amityville Horror homes?

Randall Bell is the man people call when they have a house so tainted or so notorious they don't know what to do.

The California-based real estate consultant has helped figure out a future for O.J. Simpson's mansion, JonBenet Ramsey's house and the site where the Heaven's Gate cult committed mass suicide. Most recently he consulted on the fate of Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter Adam Lanza's house in Connecticut.

But even Bell has never seen a case like "The Watcher" house in Westfield.

"I have researched damaged properties for over 25 years and have studied the effects of everything from murder and accidents, to terrorism and mass suicide," Bell said. "This situation is a new one on me."

"The Watcher" house made national news last month when a family filed a lawsuit in Superior Court in Union County claiming the previous owners failed to disclose there was a mysterious "stalker" attached to the property.

Three days after closing on the house last year, the family received the first of three threatening letters from "The Watcher," according to the lawsuit.
http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2015/0 ... roper.html

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