Stigmatized Property

General Discussion About Anything Amityville And Other Paranormal Topics
kathyM
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by kathyM » Fri Jul 03, 2015 5:43 am

The house is 657 Boulevard, Westfield, NJ. The owners are Derek and Maria Broaddus. If you check Zillow, you can see they took the house off the market in June.

I doubt there is a "watcher" other than a person who bidded on the house and lost the bid. It looks like the owners paid more than the asking price on the house so there probably was a bidding war. The "watcher" is probably pissed and is trying to get the house on the cheap when these new owners have to lower the price to get rid of it.

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Bodie_Rose
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Bodie_Rose » Fri Jul 03, 2015 7:34 am

This thread reminds me of a house relatives of mine used to live in. They rented it for a year and moved out in disgust because the landlord was a lazy ass, hardly ever bothered to do repairs or anything. About a year after they moved out, this guy was claiming the house was haunted and all his tenants were fleeing the place after a few months. He sold his story to local TV and newspapers, unfortunately he shot himself in the foot (not literally) because nobody would rent the place after that. He has the house for sale now and his haunting story is definitely in doubt after previous tenants (including my relatives) spoke out, saying it was the landlord himself that was the problem.

The place is really run down, people still don't want it. I don't think anyone really believes it's haunted, the amount of money it will take to fix the place up and the current owner trying to attract attention to it doesn't help.

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Tue Oct 06, 2015 3:59 am

'The Conjuring' Inspired Trespassers, Couple Says

A Rhode Island couple whose home inspired the horror film "The Conjuring" claims in court that the unwanted attention has turned their lives into a veritable fright fest.

Though a Harrisville, R.I., family supposedly hired paranormal investigators and performed an exorcism to rid them of malevolent spirits in the 1970s, the couple who lives there today has not reported much in the way of paranormal activity.

That is until Warner Bros. Entertainment released its 2013 film "The Conjuring," starring Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga.

With Halloween around the corner, Norma Sutcliffe and Gerald Helfrich want the Bristol County Superior Court to hold Warner Bros. responsible for the "Conjuring-instigated siege of their property."

They say the last year and a half since the film's release has brought them nothing but "threats of physical violence and harm, sleepless nights, and worry that one day, one of the many trespassers will commit an act of destruction, violence, or harm."

Warner Bros. produced and released the film without notifying them at all, telling horror fans that the film was based on a true story that occurred in their home, according to the Sept. 30 complaint.

Since "The Conjuring" hit theaters on July 19, 2013, the couple say they have had to make "almost daily calls for police assistance" to deal with the constant trespassers whom the film inspires to visit the property.

Sutcliffe and Helfrich say they bought the farmhouse in 1987 and they lived there "in peace" until 2013.

Proving that the movie is responsible for bringing the couple unwanted attention, they point to a video of two trespassers put on YouTube on July 25, 2013.

In the video, two Rhode Islanders note "that until they saw 'The Conjuring,' they did not know the property on which it was based was in Harrisville," according to the complaint.

Sutcliffe and Helfrich name these two pranksters as defendants to the lawsuit. Three other individual "trespassers" are also named as defendants.

The plaintiffs call it "clearly foreseeable" that marketing the horror movie as being based on a true story and identifying the house's location would cause "sudden, devastating damage" to the couple.

Indeed older films such as "Amityville Horror" caused similar reactions.
http://www.courthousenews.com/2015/10/0 ... e-says.htm

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Mon Oct 26, 2015 5:31 am

Should realtors tell potential buyers about houses' hauntings?
No law requires disclosing ‘haunted’ properties, but disclosure seldom hampers sale

Connie Cox has been a real-estate agent for three decades, but one listing still haunts her. 

“A few years back, I went on a listing appointment in Pleasantville” in Fairfield County, Cox recalled. 

“As I was talking to the owners about the house, they started telling me that the house was haunted. We were at the kitchen table, and they had all these spoons and things hung on the wall. She told me that sometimes they just fly off the one wall and hit the other wall. She then proceeded to tell me that the ghost’s name was Rufus. He was a grumpy old man that liked young women. Sometimes a liquid would come down from the second floor and spill all over her rocking chair that was in the sitting room.”

Cox left the meeting with the listing and a rare real-estate dilemma: What should she tell prospective buyers about a haunted house?

“Nobody knew how to deal with it,” she said. “I’d been licensed 31 years and had never encountered it.”

Ohio law requires sellers and agents to disclose any “material fact” about a home to buyers.

A sinking foundation or a leaky roof?

Those are easy.

“Is it really a fact that the house is haunted?” wondered Peg Ritenour, a vice president and legal expert with the Ohio Association of Realtors.

“In Ohio, we have no statutory provision that requires disclosures of ghosts,” she added. “But, hey, I’d want to know if I was buying the Amityville Horror house.”
More at:
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories ... state.html

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Thu Mar 31, 2016 3:08 pm

LA's Creepy Murder House Is Now Up For Sale After Laying Vacant for 50 Years

The house at 2475 Glendower Place in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles has it all: four bedrooms, ample parking, and a hell of a history. In 1959, its owner killed his wife and critically injured his teenage daughter before committing suicide. The house has been unoccupied ever since—but that may soon change.

The 5,000-plus square foot house, which was built in 1925, is on the market for $2.75 million. It’s also become a macabre local landmark, which isn’t exactly mentioned in the real estate listing:
http://io9.gizmodo.com/las-creepy-murde ... 1768047598

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Mon Oct 31, 2016 4:47 am

In Australia...
Is there a ghost in the house? Things real estate agents must tell you

Think a house you're interested in could be haunted? Just ask the agent: they have to tell you.

When selling a property, agents are required to disclose more than just its physical attributes and location strong points. They must also reveal any relevant information that may impact a buyer or renter's perception of the property that might not be immediately visible.

As a consequence, agents are often faced with situations where they are aware of a property's feature or attribute that may detract from its appeal to prospective buyers or renters. These types of issues can result in a property being "stigmatised", which means that an undesirable event has taken place there.

Across Australia, state and territory legislation, as well as codes and standards of conduct of the real estate institutes, require agents to act honestly, fairly and reasonably in their dealings with clients. The Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (Cth) also prohibits parties from engaging in misleading or deceptive conduct.

Stigmas can be wide ranging and include an untimely death (such as a murder or suicide) at the property; the scene of a violent crime; undesirable or troublesome neighbours; environmental issues such as pollution or contamination; and/or the presence of ghosts.

Yes, that's right, the presence of ghosts.

Carter Newell Lawyers partner, Michael Gapes, said agents don't need to confirm whether the "ghost" is real or not, but rather accept that its potential "presence" may stigmatise the property.
http://www.afr.com/real-estate/is-there ... 925-gro22j

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sherbetbizarre
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by sherbetbizarre » Sun Jan 01, 2017 5:47 pm

Brokers call these homes stigmatized properties, but in New York state and elsewhere, disclosure is required only for material defects: leaky pipes, termite damage, lead paint, bedbug infestations. They do not have to reveal if a property was the site of a death - suicide or homicide - or of a crime.

Disclosing a property's macabre past may seem like the ethical thing to do, and buyers or renters are likely to discover it on their own anyway, but some argue that when marketing a home, brokers should keep certain things secret.

"I think most Realtors actually think they have to disclose," said Neil B. Garfinkel, a brokerage counsel for the Real Estate Board of New York who fields questions for its legal help line. "They can't, they're not supposed to at all," he said. "The point is to make sure that the property is not stigmatized. It's to protect the property."

Randall Bell, an economist and an author of "Real Estate Damages" who has consulted on the appraisals of notorious properties, like the homes of O.J. Simpson and JonBenét Ramsey, said a stigma can erase up to 25 percent of the value. He added, though, that as time passes and memories fade, the value eventually returns.

"My advice for brokers is to tell the truth," Bell said. "I generally advise them to get the properties occupied. Don't let them sit empty."
http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20161 ... isly-pasts

Amityville Rock
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Amityville Rock » Tue Jan 03, 2017 4:16 pm

Theoretically, say you buy a well known alleged haunted house like 108 Ocean Avenue and the realtor doesn't warn you ahead of time and something later happens. Could you then sue that realtor and perhaps the former owners for lack of disclosure?
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Dan the Damned
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Re: Stigmatized Property

Post by Dan the Damned » Wed Jun 17, 2020 11:19 pm

The following posts were deleted from this thread due to an accident:




sherbetbizarre wrote:
Tue May 28, 2019 3:15 pm
New article:
Want a great deal on a house? Find one where someone was murdered
A gruesome death in a home can slash the sale price by as much as 25%. But is the discount worth it?

Image

the realtor who brokered the past three sales of the Amityville home, who blames the onslaught of curious out-of-towners who stop and take pictures of the house for its steep depreciation — not buyer superstition.
https://thehustle.co/what-happens-when- ... n-a-house/




Brooke Forrester wrote:
Tue May 28, 2019 4:46 pm
Amityville Rock wrote:
Tue Jan 03, 2017 4:16 pm
Theoretically, say you buy a well known alleged haunted house like 108 Ocean Avenue and the realtor doesn't warn you ahead of time and something later happens. Could you then sue that realtor and perhaps the former owners for lack of disclosure?
I believe the answer to that is yes! At least I saw that on some paranormal show. A couple sued the realtor for not disclosing the house’s history and they experienced paranormal activity. I think it said they won.




Brendan72 wrote:
Tue May 28, 2019 10:27 pm
sherbetbizarre wrote:
Tue May 28, 2019 3:15 pm
New article:
Want a great deal on a house? Find one where someone was murdered
A gruesome death in a home can slash the sale price by as much as 25%. But is the discount worth it?

Image

the realtor who brokered the past three sales of the Amityville home, who blames the onslaught of curious out-of-towners who stop and take pictures of the house for its steep depreciation — not buyer superstition.
https://thehustle.co/what-happens-when- ... n-a-house/
How does this price stack up against other similar houses in the area? Property market has taken a bit of a hit, and not sure it is worldwide.




TC1 wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 8:27 am
I know of a house that is pretty much a carbon copy of that house and it's only $238,000




Victor_Pascow wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:31 am
The area I live in the UK you couldn't even buy a 2-3 bedroom apartment for $238k (£186k GBP)!




Amit Y Ville wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 12:39 pm
The Amityville house is worth every penny if this community worked together to co-own it. The possibilities are endless. This would be a game changer.




Matt9290 wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 3:38 pm
Victor_Pascow wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:31 am
The area I live in the UK you couldn't even buy a 2-3 bedroom apartment for $238k (£186k GBP)!
Yeah same in my neck of the woods Victor... They certainly get their money's worth in the USA!




Brendan72 wrote:
Mon Jun 17, 2019 4:21 am
Victor_Pascow wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 5:31 am
The area I live in the UK you couldn't even buy a 2-3 bedroom apartment for $238k (£186k GBP)!
Let's not forget the property taxes in that area of Amityville.




TC1 wrote:
Sun Jun 30, 2019 5:56 am
Here's the house by the way, https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10-S ... 9755_zpid/
It has gone down 1.2% since I posted that!








Amit Y Ville wrote:
Thu Sep 19, 2019 11:42 am
Only heard of Amityville and Sallie House which only heard of recently as there's a doc on Amazon Prime apparently made by high school students on it.




sherbetbizarre wrote:
Wed Mar 11, 2020 4:17 am
Now a TV show!
When the job site is a murder scene

“When I got the call to come in for an audition, I laughed. I thought my manager was joking,” recalls designer Mikel Welch. No joke—it was serious. Deadly serious.

Murder House Flip, a show debuting next month on new streaming platform Quibi, stars Welch in a genre-bending mashup of true crime and home makeover. In each episode, he teams up with Los Angeles–based designer Joelle Uzyel to visit a family living in a house where a murder has been committed. Their goal? Cleanse the bad vibes with the power of fresh paint and statement lighting.

From Murder House Flip, Welch is expecting some interesting queries. “I have a feeling I’m going to get all kinds of crazy messages,” he says. “I would like to do the Amityville house, though.”
https://businessofhome.com/articles/whe ... rder-scene




Brendan72 wrote:
Wed Mar 11, 2020 9:28 pm
All I can say to them is good luck in getting Amityville Township to agree. If they ever did I would definitely watch that episode.




sherbetbizarre wrote:
Thu Mar 19, 2020 3:51 pm




Marilyn P wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:46 pm
If I knew what had happened in advance, it would be a hard pass for me. :naughty:




sherbetbizarre wrote:
Mon May 04, 2020 4:37 pm
No one wants this free house because it is ‘too haunted’ & locals keep telling everyone

A home in the United States has become available to a new tenant, but despite being completely free of charge, all potential homeowners have been driven away from the property.

Realtors are struggling to get rid of the Louisiana home after locals insisted that the property is haunted, comparing it to the Amityville Horror House.

The four-bedroom house was built in the late 1920s to early 1930s and is available for no cost, but after sharing photos of the property on Facebook, Sylvia McLain’s post was overwhelmed by comments about supernatural experiences from former tenants and local residents.
https://extra.ie/2020/05/03/must-see/re ... me-haunted




Brendan72 wrote:
Wed May 06, 2020 6:44 pm
'Too haunted'? They obviously want a house that is 'sort of' haunted, or 'minimally' haunted.

Some buyers will do anything to negotiate a lower price. :fp:

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